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8 Activities For Children this Christmas

Keeping children entertained at any time of the year is no easy task, yet we know the importance of being able to bond with your foster children over the festive period to make sure they feel relaxed, comfortable and generally upbeat.

Whilst there are many Christmas related activities that are bound to keep your family entertained for hours, it’s certainly reassuring to know that the Perpetual Fostering team are only a phone call away if you ever feel that the festivities are becoming a little too much for you or your foster child.

Following on from last year’s article all about including foster children in the festive season, we’ve come up with 8 simple and low-cost ways in which you can engage your children in various activities over the Christmas period.

1. Why not cook up a storm?

When the weather outside is frightful, there’s nothing more delightful than the smell of freshly baked cookies and cakes. Everything you need to make simple Christmas biscuits can be bought for a few pounds and sitting down as a family to scoff the efforts of a day stood by the oven is almost as rewarding as baking them!

2. DIY Christmas Decorations

A home adorned with homemade creations looks far more beautiful, so why not gather some paper and craft supplies, stick on some Christmas music, and let everyone go to town decorating.

3. Go for a Winter Walk

Heading out for a brisk walk on a crisp winter’s morning is not just a great way to blow off a bit of yuletide steam, but it’s also a great opportunity to teach children about the great outdoors and to increase their sense of adventure. Don’t forget about the well deserved hot chocolates afterwards either!

4. Play Some Board Games

In the age of iPads and smartphones, why not go back to basics with a game of Monopoly or Trivial Pursuit? Traditional board games are a fantastic way of getting the whole family involved, and we have no doubt that you and your children will be able to learn a thing or two.

5. Take in the local lights

The good about christmas is that there’s plenty of things to see and do, especially when it comes to lights and decorations. There are often various free light displays put on by local councils across the country which are well worth checking out.

6. Make a Scrapbook

Christmas is a time for making memories, so why not make a personalised scrapbook that your foster child could cherish for years to come. Using photographs, tickets and other mementos, create something beautiful this Christmas.

7. Make Your Own Christmas Cards

Everybody has a few leftover craft supplies, so get the children involved and let them create some homemade christmas cards that your friends and family will just love.

8. Christmas Movie Night

Everyone has their own favourite Christmas film, so why not dedicate one night in the run up to Christmas to watch everyone’s! Second hand DVD shops often sell a range of Christmas classics for a pound or two.

Whilst it’s clearly important to involve the whole family over the Christmas period in various activities to help keep them entertained, there are often other benefits that can be gained from doing any of the above.

It’s vital that you look to praise and reinforce your foster child’s sense of achievement when undertaking any activity over Christmas and New Year. In addition to this, such activities also allow a foster child’s contribution to be heard, which can certainly increase their confidence and sense of belonging as young people.

If you have any questions or queries about fostering over the festive period, or perhaps you’re interested in finding out the benefits you can receive by fostering with us, make sure you contact our head office today.

Article Information

Posted on 24 December 2015

Posted in Foster Caring / Fostering children

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