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Controlling Your Angry Feelings

Now and again, different situations can cause us to become angry. There’s nothing wrong with feeling angry as it’s a natural response when something upsets or frustrates us, but what you need to be careful about is how you deal with these feelings and what actions you take.

If someone gets angry a lot and their actions become out of control as a result, some people may say that they ‘have a temper’. When someone says they ‘lose their temper’ easily, it usually means that they react differently when they’re frustrated or angry. Usually a person becomes angry when they don’t know how to express their feelings or diffuse a situation, so a way that you can control your anger is to work out how you can calm yourself down and de-stress a situation.

Take control of the situation
Only you can decide whether you’re in control of your emotions and actions. By saying to yourself, “I’m in control” you can decide what you do with your feelings and your actions when you get angry.

Talk about your feelings
You may not be very confident with talking about your feelings to others, but even just a chat with your parent, carer or a friend can make you feel so much better. This will make it easier for them to help you and to know when you might have a moment of anger.

Just breathe
Even just completing simple breathing exercises can make you feel a lot calmer and give you a better perspective of a situation so that you don’t end up ‘losing your temper.’

Take yourself away from the situation
If you know that being in a certain situation or environment will only increase your feelings of anger and frustration, try to remove yourself from that situation simply by going into another room or going outside into your garden for a moment.

Article Information

Posted on 24 June 2015

Posted in Advice for young people

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